Regenerative Biology – Regbiomed http://regbiomed.com/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 15:19:01 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://regbiomed.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/09/icon-150x150.png Regenerative Biology – Regbiomed http://regbiomed.com/ 32 32 Short-term interest in PureTech Health plc (NASDAQ:PRTC) drops 32.1% https://regbiomed.com/short-term-interest-in-puretech-health-plc-nasdaqprtc-drops-32-1/ Sun, 31 Jul 2022 15:19:01 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/short-term-interest-in-puretech-health-plc-nasdaqprtc-drops-32-1/ PureTech Health plc (NASDAQ: PRTC – Get a rating) was the target of a significant drop in short interest in July. As of July 15, there was short interest totaling 1,900 shares, down 32.1% from the June 30 total of 2,800 shares. Based on an average daily volume of 5,500 shares, the day-to-cover ratio is […]]]>

PureTech Health plc (NASDAQ: PRTC – Get a rating) was the target of a significant drop in short interest in July. As of July 15, there was short interest totaling 1,900 shares, down 32.1% from the June 30 total of 2,800 shares. Based on an average daily volume of 5,500 shares, the day-to-cover ratio is currently 0.3 days.

PureTech Health Price Performance

NASDAQ PRTC shares traded at $0.91 during Friday trading hours, hitting $24.64. The stock recorded trading volume of 2,039 shares, compared to an average trading volume of 4,419 shares. The company has a debt ratio of 0.02, a quick ratio of 2.22 and a current ratio of 2.22. The company’s fifty-day moving average is $22.24 and its two-hundred-day moving average is $26.72. PureTech Health has a 12-month low of $18.15 and a 12-month high of $56.46.

Analysts set new price targets

A number of research analysts have recently commented on the company. Piper Sandler set a target price of $37.00 on PureTech Health in a Monday, June 20 research note. SVB Leerink reduced its target price on PureTech Health from $70.00 to $66.00 and set an “outperform” rating for the company in a Wednesday, June 15 research note.

About PureTech Health

(Get a rating)

PureTech Health plc, a clinical-stage biotherapeutics company, discovers, develops and markets drugs for inflammatory, fibrotic and immunological, incurable, lymphatic and gastrointestinal, neurological and neuropsychological cancers, and other diseases in the United States. The Company offers KarXT targeting muscarinic acetylcholine receptors to treat schizophrenia and psychosis in Alzheimer’s disease; a regenerative biology platform for androgenetic alopecia, epithelial aging and other medical conditions; an immunomodulation platform to treat chronic and acute inflammatory disorders; oral therapies based on defined consortia of bacteria are isolated from the human microbiome; and therapies to treat cognitive dysfunctions associated with depression, multiple sclerosis, post-COVID and critical care, and cancer-related conditions.

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UTSW researcher on team awarded $36 million cardiac research grant https://regbiomed.com/utsw-researcher-on-team-awarded-36-million-cardiac-research-grant/ Fri, 29 Jul 2022 20:51:22 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/utsw-researcher-on-team-awarded-36-million-cardiac-research-grant/ The British Heart Foundation has announced the winner of its $36 million Big Beat Challengeone of the largest non-commercial prizes ever awarded for cardiac research. Winner team, CureHeartbrings together researchers from the UK, US and Asia, including Eric Olson, Professor and Head of the Department of Molecular Biology at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Olson is […]]]>

The British Heart Foundation has announced the winner of its $36 million Big Beat Challengeone of the largest non-commercial prizes ever awarded for cardiac research.

Winner team, CureHeartbrings together researchers from the UK, US and Asia, including Eric Olson, Professor and Head of the Department of Molecular Biology at UT Southwestern Medical Center.

Olson is the founding chair of the department and directs the Hamon Center for Regenerative Science and Medicine and the Wellstone Center for Muscular Dystrophy Research. He holds the Robert A. Welch Chair of Scientific Distinction and the Annie and Willie Nelson Chair in Stem Cell Research.

Eric Olson and the Olson Lab study muscle development and disease at UT Southwestern.(Mei Chun Jau)

He has spent his career studying heart and muscle development and disease, which led him to participate in the CureHeart team. The Olson Laboratory at UTSW has had incredible success in muscle research, most recently providing a new way to correct the mutation that causes Duchenne muscular dystrophy through gene editing.

CureHeart topped the list with its gene-editing therapy aimed at curing inherited diseases of the heart muscle, known as cardiomyopathies.

A statement from BHF said the technology “will seek to develop the first cures for inherited heart muscle diseases by pioneering breakthrough, ultra-precise gene therapy technologies that could edit or silence the faulty genes that cause these deadly conditions.” .

The project will use CRISPR gene-editing technology to complete core and core editing in the heart for the first time.

It works by fixing or silencing a faulty gene in the pumping machinery of the heart, either by rewriting DNA in a single location or by switching off the entire copy of the faulty gene.

The technique has been described as “molecules that act like tiny pencils to rewrite unique mutations that are buried in the DNA of heart cells” in people with heart disease.

It can also help the heart produce enough protein to function normally, again by fixing or stimulating the faulty gene.

“With ultra-precise base-editing technology, we hope to be able to correct single letter and larger errors in the genetic code. This would mark a breakthrough not only for genetic cardiomyopathies, but also for many heart diseases,” Olson said in the statement.

The project is the next step towards real-world application, having already been proven in animals with cardiomyopathies and in human cells. Team members believe the therapies could be delivered through an injection in the arm, slowing or stopping the progression of cardiomyopathies, or even completely curing the disease.

If successful, the research could have huge impacts.

“Each year in the United States, approximately 2,000 people under the age of 25 die from sudden cardiac arrest, often caused by one of these inherited muscle diseases,” the statement said. “Current treatments do not prevent the disease from progressing, and about half of all heart transplants are needed because of cardiomyopathy.”

Researchers believe it may also be successful in preventing the disease from expressing itself if it is hereditary. Children who receive the defective gene from their parents might receive the injection and never develop cardiomyopathy in the first place.

“Over the past 30 years, we have made extraordinary progress in our understanding of the genetic errors that cause cardiomyopathy. CureHeart is a once-in-a-generation opportunity to turn this knowledge into a cure,” Olson said in the release.

The technology is still in the research and development phase, but Olson said the funds will be used to optimize the method and expand it to more genetic heart conditions, and could move into clinical trials in the next few years. .

Dr. Eric Olson is the Annie and Willie Nelson Chair in Stem Cell Research at...
Dr. Eric Olson is the Annie and Willie Nelson Chair in Stem Cell Research at UTSW. He and musician Willie Nelson became friends.(UTSW)
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UCLA bioengineering department hires two new assistant professors https://regbiomed.com/ucla-bioengineering-department-hires-two-new-assistant-professors/ Thu, 28 Jul 2022 18:59:30 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/ucla-bioengineering-department-hires-two-new-assistant-professors/ The UCLA Samueli School of Engineering is proud to welcome two outstanding researchers to the Department of Bioengineering – Mireille Kamariza and Jaimie Marie Stewart — who will join the school next year as assistant teachers. Kamariza’s research focuses on low-cost healthcare diagnostics and Stewart’s research focuses on the development of programmable RNA materials. “Professors […]]]>

The UCLA Samueli School of Engineering is proud to welcome two outstanding researchers to the Department of Bioengineering – Mireille Kamariza and Jaimie Marie Stewart — who will join the school next year as assistant teachers. Kamariza’s research focuses on low-cost healthcare diagnostics and Stewart’s research focuses on the development of programmable RNA materials.

“Professors Kamariza and Stewart are among the brightest scholars in their respective emerging fields, and we are very pleased to have them join us,” said Song Li, Chair and Professor of UCLA Samueli’s Department of Bioengineering. . “Our students, fellow faculty, the UCLA community, and society as a whole will benefit from their research, teaching, and service.”

Their recruitment is part of the school’s mentor teacher programan initiative now in its second year designed to hire faculty who are experts in their fields and who have a proven track record or exceptional promise in mentoring students from underrepresented and underserved populations.

Mireille Kamariza is a chemical biologist whose research focuses on infectious diseases, including the development of inexpensive point-of-care diagnostics. As a doctoral student at Stanford University, she developed technology that helps detect and diagnose tuberculosis at the point of care, for which she received a grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to test the device. Kamariza is currently a Harvard Junior Fellow and works with renowned computational biologist Pardis Sabeti at Harvard’s Broad Institute and MIT. She will join UCLA Samueli as an assistant professor of bioengineering in January 2023.

Originally from the Republic of Burundi, Kamariza immigrated to the United States and attended San Diego Mesa College. She then transferred to UC San Diego for her bachelor’s degree in biochemistry, where she started a mentorship program for transfer students. Kamariza has demonstrated her efforts to diversify representation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) through similar initiatives, and she intends to continue pushing for more equity and inclusion in the scientific community. She received her master’s degree from UC Berkeley and her Ph.D. from Stanford University, both in cell biology. Among other accolades, Kamariza was recognized as one of the World’s Most Powerful Women by Fortune magazine in 2017 and was named one of Chemical & Engineering News’ 12 Talents of 2020.

Jaimie Marie Stewart is develop RNA technologies for molecular sensing and regenerative medicine. His research focuses on understanding and exploiting the structural and functional complexity of RNA to construct RNA materials using the principles of biophysics, chemistry and engineering. She is currently a Life Sciences Research Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow at Caltech, where she works on the design, synthesis, and characterization of DNA and RNA structures for the detection and separation of biomolecules. Stewart will join UCLA Samueli as an assistant professor of bioengineering in July 2023.

Stewart is the RNA editor for the manual Art of Molecular Programming and is a member of the Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee of Caltech’s Engineering and Applied Science Division. She has received several awards and accolades, including the 2019 Ford Postdoctoral Fellowship and recognition as a Fellow by the Intersections Science Fellows Symposium in 2021. She earned her BS in Bioengineering with a concentration in Cellular and Tissue Engineering from the University of Illinois at Chicago and his Ph.D. in bioengineering from UC Riverside.

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“ZIP” codes tell RNA molecules how to get to their designated locations https://regbiomed.com/zip-codes-tell-rna-molecules-how-to-get-to-their-designated-locations/ Tue, 26 Jul 2022 19:30:12 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/zip-codes-tell-rna-molecules-how-to-get-to-their-designated-locations/ This is a computer image of an RNA molecule. Credit: Richard Feldmann/Wikipedia They say life comes without an instruction manual, but that’s not entirely true. Every cell in our body lives according to the instructions issued by its DNA in the form of RNA molecules. RNA has recently come into the limelight as the basis […]]]>

This is a computer image of an RNA molecule. Credit: Richard Feldmann/Wikipedia

They say life comes without an instruction manual, but that’s not entirely true. Every cell in our body lives according to the instructions issued by its DNA in the form of RNA molecules. RNA has recently come into the limelight as the basis for innovative COVID-19 vaccines, but a lot of fundamental knowledge about this vital molecule – for example, how it manages to find its way through the cell to a designated location – are still lacking. Researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science have just discovered a cellular “zip code” system that ensures that all RNA gets to the right place, just in time.

Once RNAs are produced in the nucleus, some stay there to regulate gene expression, but most, especially those that carry protein recipes, are expected to leave the nucleus for the cytoplasm, where proteins are made. Previous studies aimed at clarifying how RNAs arrive at their assigned locations have produced conflicting results. Some have suggested that the routes of linear, chain-like RNA molecules might be dictated by the information contained in their free ends. Yet, some RNAs are circular and obviously have no ends. Other studies have found hints that certain short segments in RNA molecules might function as zip codes, defining the neighborhood in the cell where each RNA belongs, but different studies have reported on different zip codes, and there were limited understanding of how these postcodes might work.

Research student Maya Ron and Professor Igor Ulitsky, both from the departments of Immunology and Regenerative Biology and Molecular Neurosciences at the Weizmann Institute of Science, tested the postal code hypothesis using a technique known as the name “massively parallel RNA assay”, developed in part in Ulitsky’s lab. The technique allows thousands of different RNAs to be studied simultaneously, obtaining results in days instead of the years it would previously have taken to study those same RNAs one by one. Scientists inserted thousands of different RNA segments into various linear and circular “host” RNA molecules, copies of which were then introduced into millions of cells. After separating the nucleus from the cytoplasm of these cells, the researchers were able to tell where their RNAs ended up.

After studying some 8,000 gene segments in this way, Ron and Ulitsky discovered that several dozen of them did indeed serve as zip codes. These zip codes tell some RNAs to stay in the nucleus, tell others to move into the cytoplasm immediately, and instruct still others to make that move only after lingering in the nucleus for a certain amount of time. time. The researchers also discovered several proteins that serve as “postal clerks” whose job is to bind to RNAs, “read” their zip codes, and send the RNAs to the locations encoded in them.

Remarkably, there was a sharp divide between linear and circular RNAs within this “postal system”. For starters, the same postal code could assign an ARN to a different location, depending on whether it was linear or circular. In addition, two groups of postal workers managed the sorting, one for linear RNAs and one for circulars. In fact, each of the clerks issued their own type of instructions. For example, a protein, called IGF2BP1, binds mainly to linear RNAs, promoting their export from the nucleus. Another, called SRSF1, specialized in orienting circular RNAs to stay in the nucleus. When scientists blocked the activity of individual proteins, the RNAs sorted by each of these postal workers did not reach the correct locations in the cell.

In addition to shedding new light on how the genome works, these findings could prove useful in the design of RNA-based therapies. “Many companies are currently developing RNAs for use as drugs or vaccines,” says Ulitsky. “Understanding how they get to their location in the cell can help design artificial RNAs with the desired properties. For example, if we want an RNA-based drug to produce large amounts of a certain protein, it can be engineered to spend most of its time in the cytoplasm, where this protein can be produced.”

The study’s findings may be particularly valuable for the use of circular RNAs, which have become the focus of research relatively recently and are less well understood than linear RNAs.

“In nature, only a small percentage of RNAs are circular, but they are more stable than linear and therefore increasingly used in drug design,” says Ron.


Researchers are developing the most comprehensive RNA atlas yet


More information:
Maya Ron et al, Context-specific effects of sequence elements on subcellular localization of linear and circular RNAs, Nature Communication (2022). DOI: 10.1038/s41467-022-30183-0

Provided by Weizmann Institute of Science


Quote: ‘ZIP’ codes tell RNA molecules how to get to their designated locations (2022, July 26) Retrieved July 26, 2022 from https://phys.org/news/2022-07-codes-rna-molecules .html

This document is subject to copyright. Except for fair use for purposes of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without written permission. The content is provided for information only.

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Robotics and artificial intelligence to accelerate advances in regenerative medicine https://regbiomed.com/robotics-and-artificial-intelligence-to-accelerate-advances-in-regenerative-medicine/ Mon, 25 Jul 2022 07:50:08 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/robotics-and-artificial-intelligence-to-accelerate-advances-in-regenerative-medicine/ Scientists have developed a robotic artificial intelligence system to determine the optimal conditions for growing the replacement retinal layers needed for certain treatments aimed at restoring vision. In the latest experiment, the system underwent a process of trial and error covering 200 million possible configurations and managed to significantly improve the viability of cell cultures […]]]>

Scientists have developed a robotic artificial intelligence system to determine the optimal conditions for growing the replacement retinal layers needed for certain treatments aimed at restoring vision. In the latest experiment, the system underwent a process of trial and error covering 200 million possible configurations and managed to significantly improve the viability of cell cultures needed for regenerative medicine therapy. This achievement is a good example of how the automated design and execution of scientific experiments can increase the efficiency and speed of research in fields such as biology.

Research in regenerative medicine often requires many time-consuming and laborious experiments. Specifically, creating specialized tissue from stem cells (a process called induced cell differentiation) takes months of work, and the degree of success depends on a wide range of variables. Finding the optimal type, dosage, and timing of reagents as well as the optimal physical variables, such as cell transfer time or temperature, is difficult and requires an enormous amount of testing.

To make this procedure more efficient and convenient, a research team led by Genki Kanda of the RIKEN Institute in Japan set out to develop a stand-alone experimental system that could determine the optimal conditions and the functional retina can develop layers of pigment. Retinal pigment epithelial cells were chosen because degeneration of these cells is a common age-related disorder that renders people unable to see. More importantly, transplanted retinal pigment epithelial layers have already shown some clinical success.

For autonomous experiments to be successful, the robots must repeatedly perform the same series of precise movements and manipulations, and the artificial intelligence must be able to evaluate the results and prepare for the next experiment. The new system achieves these goals with a general-purpose humanoid robot called Maholo, capable of high-precision biological experiments. Maholo is controlled by artificial intelligence software that uses a newly designed optimization algorithm to determine which parameters need to be changed and how they need to be changed, so that the next set of experiments can lead to differentiation. efficiency can be improved.

The AI-equipped robotic system tested 200 million possible configurations, ultimately succeeding in conclusively improving the “recipe” used for the retinal regenerative medicine procedure it was working on. (Photo: Riken)

In what would have taken human researchers more than two and a half years, a robotic system with artificial intelligence took just 185 days, resulting in an initial differentiation rate efficiency of 50% to 90%, through experimentation and robot performance. Improvement works carried out.

Kanda and his colleagues discovered the technical details of their progress in the academic journal eLife, under the title “Robotic Discovery for Optimal Cell Culture in Regenerative Medicine”. (Character font: NCYT D Incredible,

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How the gut replaces and repairs itself https://regbiomed.com/how-the-gut-replaces-and-repairs-itself/ Fri, 22 Jul 2022 18:57:40 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/how-the-gut-replaces-and-repairs-itself/ image: Lateral view of the small intestine with lymphatic capillaries in yellow and intestinal stem cells in pink. see After Credit: Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development at Rockefeller University To act as a robust barrier against pathogens while absorbing necessary nutrients, the intestinal lining must regenerate daily to stay up […]]]>

image: Lateral view of the small intestine with lymphatic capillaries in yellow and intestinal stem cells in pink.
see After

Credit: Robin Chemers Neustein Laboratory of Mammalian Cell Biology and Development at Rockefeller University

To act as a robust barrier against pathogens while absorbing necessary nutrients, the intestinal lining must regenerate daily to stay up to the task. The gut’s resident stem cells are responsible for meeting this need for constant repair and replenishment, but each stem cell faces decisions that depend on the general conditions of the gut and the needs at the time. Bad decisions and poor coordination could lead to bowel disease or cancer.

A new study suggests that stem cells are able to integrate signals from their environment and coordinate their behavior across tissue through networks of vasculature in their immediate vicinity.

Rockefeller scientists discovered that lymphatic capillaries – fine vessels that transport immune cells and drain fluids from tissues – represent a signaling center that communicates with stem cells to regulate their activity. Thanks to the molecular guidance of lymphatics, stem cells produce daughter cells to repopulate the intestinal mucosa or self-renew to replenish the stem cell reserve.

The resultspublished in the journal Cell Stem Cell, provide new insights into primary gut components whose disrupted communication may contribute to gut disorders, such as inflammatory bowel disease. “The key to treating these diseases will be figuring out who is talking to whom in this ecosystem and how we can reset the communication networks,” says Rachel Niec, clinician scientist in the lab of Elaine Fuchs.

Communications in the crypt

Intestinal stem cells reside in so-called crypts, located at the base of densely packed indentations in the intestinal lining. Stem cells can renew themselves and remain in the crypt, or differentiate into specialized cells, which then migrate out of the crypt to replenish the intestinal mucosa. “To understand how stem cells balance self-renewal with differentiation, we needed a more complete picture of crypt niches,” says Fuchs lab graduate student Marina Schernthanner.

To zoom into the crypt, the team used a suite of techniques, including single-cell and spatial transcriptomics, which allowed them to identify cell types in specific locations and study their signaling molecules. The results showed that lymphatic capillaries, which form an intimate connection with stem cells in the crypt, produce a number of proteins known to be important for stem cell function.

A previously underestimated protein, REELIN, has emerged as a prime candidate for mediating communications between lymph cells and stem cells. By manipulating the amount of REELIN in lab-grown intestinal organoid cultures in some experiments and genetically suppressing it in mice in others, the researchers found that REELIN directly mediates the regenerative behavior of intestinal stem cells.

The involvement of the lymphatic system in the functioning of stem cells is a relatively new concept. A previous study by the Fuchs team revealed that the lymphatics are also closely involved with skin stem cells and play a key role in hair regeneration. There, however, it is the hair follicle stem cells that signal to the lymph capillaries. By controlling their interactions with the lymphatics, stem cells synchronize hair regeneration through the tissue. “This suggests that lymphatics may be a conserved feature of stem cell niches, but their relationship to stem cells is likely tailored to the needs of each tissue,” Niec says.


Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of press releases posted on EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system.

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Global Biobanking Market Expected to Grow at a CAGR of 4.67% by 2032: Visiongain Reports Ltd https://regbiomed.com/global-biobanking-market-expected-to-grow-at-a-cagr-of-4-67-by-2032-visiongain-reports-ltd/ Thu, 21 Jul 2022 07:53:00 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/global-biobanking-market-expected-to-grow-at-a-cagr-of-4-67-by-2032-visiongain-reports-ltd/ Visiongain Ltd Reports Visiongain has released a new report titled Biobank 2022-2032. It includes Biobank Profiles and Forecast Market Segment by Type (Standalone, Partnership) Market Segment by Application, (Regenerative Medicine, Life Science Research, Clinical Research) Market Segment by Ownership, (National/Regional, universities, non-profit, private) Market segment by sample type (blood products, human tissues, nucleic acids, cell […]]]>

Visiongain Ltd Reports

Visiongain has released a new report titled Biobank 2022-2032. It includes Biobank Profiles and Forecast Market Segment by Type (Standalone, Partnership) Market Segment by Application, (Regenerative Medicine, Life Science Research, Clinical Research) Market Segment by Ownership, (National/Regional, universities, non-profit, private) Market segment by sample type (blood products, human tissues, nucleic acids, cell lines, biological fluids, other samples) Market segment by product and service (equipment, consumables, services, software) plus COVID-19 Impact Analysis and Recovery Model Analysis (“V-Shaped”, “W-Shaped”, “U-Shaped”, “L-Shaped”), Key Company Profiles, region and country.

The global Biobanking Market was valued at USD 56,955 million in 2021 and is projected to grow at a CAGR of 4.67% during the forecast period 2022-2032.

Growing Opportunities for IT Companies in the Biobanking Market

Biobanks strive to allocate funding to IT companies because it is suitable for all biobanking activities, from recruiting subjects to publishing research results. Primary investment objectives include specimen management as well as an accessible channel for organizations and individuals. An area of ​​growing interest is the use of common standards to provide access to clinical and experimental databases. If the ontologies are properly standardized, this allows a thorough annotation of the examples. For example, the ongoing and resource-intensive standardization of disease coding and specimen categorization. Standardization will become a major bottleneck for biobanks if it is not completed in time. Scientists are also concerned about interoperability between biobanks around the world.

Download sample: https://www.visiongain.com/report/biobanking-market-2022/#download_sampe_div

How has COVID-19 had a significant negative impact on the biobank market?

Globally, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak is having a significant influence on the social, political, economic and health systems of many countries around the world. There are several concurrent clinical concerns during a pandemic, from the urgent need to understand the biology of the disease to the need for optimal treatment of patients and prevention of cases in the future. Research infrastructures, and in particular biobanks, have positioned themselves at the forefront of the many distinct COVID-19 responses that are needed. Initiatives have been reported to compile population-level databases of COVID-19 patients, symptomatic carriers, and members of the general public in the European Union (EU), Taiwan, and other locations. An attempt to build clinically meaningful cohorts also occurs in low-resource settings where some infrastructure was accessible and maintained over time. In many cases, this effort is linked to a management structure that is more open to sharing specimens and data.

How will this report help you?

Visiongain’s 558-page report provides 357 charts and 309 charts/graphs. Our new study is suitable for anyone who needs in-depth business analyzes of the global biobanking market, as well as detailed analysis of market segments. Our new study will help you assess the entire global and regional Biobanking market. Get the financial analysis of the overall market and different segments including type, process, upstream, downstream, and business size, and capture a higher market share. We believe there are strong opportunities in this growing biobanking market. Find out how to use the existing and upcoming opportunities in this market to generate revenue in the near future. Moreover, the report will help you improve your strategic decision-making, enabling you to set growth strategies, strengthen analysis of other market players and maximize business productivity.

What are the current market drivers?

The rapid development of the field of biobanks provides access to vast sources of human biological material and related data

The main objective of biobanks seems to be the knowledge of diseases and the creation of new therapies. Additionally, while the goal of biobank research is to shed new light on the genetic underpinnings of human disease, another key goal is to provide a more automated and tailored approach to therapy. With the rapid growth of biobanks, it is now possible to collect large repositories of non-human biological material, including plants, animals, and microorganisms, among others. The expansion of many biobanks along with reporting and tracking is expected to revolutionize research, enabling personalized medicine and other benefits.

Increased focus on genetic testing and precision medicine

Today’s mainstream therapies often don’t work because they don’t take into account a person’s unique traits and genetic makeup. The search for more effective and precise treatment throughout history led to the creation of the scientific field known as “personalized medicine”. Personalized medicine has been recognized by the next generations of diagnosis and treatment following important technical developments in this field. Although it has garnered a lot of attention lately, significant obstacles still hinder its application in clinical practice. The limits were recently revealed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Precision and personalized medicine is transforming medical diagnosis and paving the way for in-depth patient-centric diagnostics.

Download sample: https://www.visiongain.com/report/biobanking-market-2022/#download_sampe_div

Where are the market opportunities?

Advancement of biomedical research and personalized treatment require human biospecimens

The development of personalized medicine and the discovery of biomarkers depend on human biospecimens. Biobanks collect, store and distribute cells, blood, various biofluids and residual tissue samples from patients for scientific study. Until recently, the market was very diverse, with biobanks catering to a particular market and typically not maintaining a comprehensive collection of testing information for each sample. It needs an overhaul, which thankfully several exciting new companies are starting to deliver. For the successful use of biospecimens, associated data and downstream research, as well as for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries, biobanks are essential resources. The best biobanking techniques are highly dependent on individuals and their interests. By exchanging information, using state-of-the-art technological solutions and complying with some of the latest standards, biobanks can reach their full potential.

Growing focus on cell therapies

Patients can now receive treatment for a variety of diseases that were previously incurable due to the development of the cell and gene therapy industry. As a result, pharmaceutical companies spend a lot of money on research and development to develop new therapies, and several gene and cell therapy pharmaceuticals are now in the early stages of development. Along with substantial investments in R&D, the industry is expected to experience strong commercial growth. Emerging economies around the world offer a wide range of business opportunities to stakeholders.

Competitive landscape
The major players operating in the biobanking market are AMS Biotechnology (Europe) Ltd., ASKION GmbH, Avantor, Inc., Azenta, Inc. (Azenta), Bay Biosciences LLC, Bioivt & Elevating Science, Boca Biolistics, CTI Biotech, Cureline Inc., Firalis SA, Geneticist Inc., Hamilton Bonaduz AG, Isenet Biobanking, Merck & Co., Inc., ProteoGenex Inc., Qiagen NV, Stemcell Holdings, Inc., STEMCELL Technologies Inc., Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., US Biolab Corp. Inc. The major players operating in this market have adopted various strategies including mergers and acquisitions, R&D investments, collaborations, partnerships, regional business expansion, and new product launches.

RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

  • On May 5, 2022, Avantor, Inc. announced plans to combine its current distribution center with new manufacturing operations in Singapore to establish a new manufacturing and distribution center.

  • On April 19, 2022, Applied Cells Inc. and STEMCELL Technologies Canada Inc. announced their partnership to develop a new high-performance cell separation solution that combines Applied Cells’ MARS® platform with the EasySepMT immunomagnetic cell separation kits from STEMCELL. Through this collaboration, researchers around the world will be able to more efficiently and automatically separate high-quality cells from a variety of sample types, including whole blood, bone marrow, apheresis products, and dissociated tissues.

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E-mail: dev.visavadia@visiongain.com

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‘We only grow what thrives’: San Felipe Farm in Polk County regenerates the land – The Tryon Daily Bulletin https://regbiomed.com/we-only-grow-what-thrives-san-felipe-farm-in-polk-county-regenerates-the-land-the-tryon-daily-bulletin/ Tue, 19 Jul 2022 16:11:28 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/we-only-grow-what-thrives-san-felipe-farm-in-polk-county-regenerates-the-land-the-tryon-daily-bulletin/ By Rose Jenkins Lane news@tryondailybulletin.com It’s Rafael Bravo’s favorite part of the day, when he moves his sheep to the fresh grass. The sheep know it’s coming. If they see Rafael or his wife Mary, all the mother ewes and young lambs start bleating. They want the grass party they can see right through a […]]]>

By Rose Jenkins Lane

news@tryondailybulletin.com

It’s Rafael Bravo’s favorite part of the day, when he moves his sheep to the fresh grass. The sheep know it’s coming. If they see Rafael or his wife Mary, all the mother ewes and young lambs start bleating. They want the grass party they can see right through a moving fence line. They live for the moment each afternoon when they move to a new paddock – a quarter acre of pasture where the grass grows tall and lush.

“If you are there when we feed them, you will see them all running around. They run like little children, all 40,” says Rafael. “It’s amazing. I like it a lot.”

As soon as they move, the sheep start gorging on grass. As Rafael watches them, what he sees is that the earth is improving. Six years ago, the Bravos retreated to Polk County to start their farm. And even during this short time, Rafael can see the soil becoming more fertile. The grass becomes denser and more nourishing. Sheep give back to the grass, fertilizing it with their manure, and the grass supports strong, healthy sheep.

Rafael looks at this year’s lambs. “Look at them,” he said. “They are bulky, square and beautiful animals.”

Everything comes back to the ground, he says. “You see the grass as it is. It’s because of the sheep and the nutrition in the soil. Soil is the number one resource for us. Without good soil, there is nothing. Without weed, we can’t keep anyone.

“I always wanted to do this,” says Rafael. “It’s who I am.” For generations, his family has farmed in Venezuela at the foot of the Andes. He cherishes his memories of working on a horse ranch and sleeping outside in a hammock.

Rafael and Mary met in England, where he went to study agricultural economics. She was from Ohio and was studying biology. After completing their studies abroad, the two courted across international borders for two years. When they decided to get married, Rafael moved to the United States and worked in the agricultural industry. For many years he sourced mushrooms for Cambell’s Soup. Mary got her Ph.D. and became a neuroscientist and professor at Rutgers University. They raised two children.

But once their children grew up, Rafael felt the time was right to pursue his farming dream. “Rafael dreamed of retiring on a farm,” says Mary, “and I was happy to make his dream come true.” He retired from the younger side and Mary partially retired, continuing to teach online.

They found their land in Columbus in 2012, captivated by its rolling hills and sprawling oak trees. The farm is 18 acres, about half woods and half open land. They moved there in 2016 the same day the sheep arrived. Now they also have a cow, chickens, a large garden, beehives and mushroom logs. They named it San Felipe Farm, a name inherited from a coffee plantation belonging to Rafael’s grandmother.

People told them not to farm in retirement, says Mary. They said it would be too much work. And that’s true. Some days it’s a lot of work.

Still, Rafael says, “People decide to retire in different ways, don’t they? Some people live in cruise ships. People play golf five days a week. We do neither. We love to travel but we only travel once every two years.

Plus, as retirees, they don’t face the same financial pressures they would have faced as young farmers. They had other careers while raising children and saving for retirement. This means they can now keep the business side of farming relatively simple and focus on the parts that bring them joy.

“I love the outdoors,” says Rafael. “You hear the birds. My days are outside and I enjoy it a lot. They start early and don’t finish until late in the evening. There’s a break in the middle and I’m taking a nap and looking forward to it too. I am grateful every day.

The Bravos do their best to farm sustainably, even regeneratively, bringing new life to the land. But there were a lot of things they didn’t know about farming, especially in this new place. So, they relied on advice from the Polk County office of the NC Agricultural Extension. For example, when they said they wanted to grow grapes without chemicals, the extension office pointed them to muscadines.

They were right, said Mary; muscadines are indestructible. “We only grow what thrives,” she says. After their cherries were decimated by beetles, instead of spraying to kill the pests, they replaced their cherry trees with peach trees.

Rafael explains that they chose sheep because they can be the best livestock for the land. They do not compact the soil like large animals. They also drop small pellets of manure everywhere, compared to large cow pies, so they spread fertilizer over more of the ground.

Meanwhile, their rotational grazing system – a new paddock every day for 25 days – keeps the land healthy. Grass is never overgrazed; the ground does not become bare; and each paddock can recover for nearly a month before the sheep come back.

They use minimal chemicals except for invasive species such as kudzu and hemlock woolly aphids. And they limit inorganic fertilizers to one treatment per year.

For Rafael, the increasingly dense and lush grass is a testament to the growing fertility of the soil. That means all farm animals benefit, he says, including wild animals like deer, coyotes, foxes, raccoons, owls and all manner of birds and insects.

The farm provides much of the Bravos’ food – tasty vegetables, fruits, eggs, milk and beef, as well as homemade cheese, butter, yogurt and ice cream.

Meanwhile, farm income comes mainly from sheep. They raise Katahdin sheep, a breed prized for their meat. As they raise increasingly high quality registered Katahdins, most of their female lambs and some of the males are sold for breeding, which the Bravos are happy to see. Yet, ultimately, sheep or their offspring become meat.

This year, the Bravos took their stewardship a step further and protected the farm with a conservation easement owned by Conserving Carolina. The easement ensures that the land will never be developed; instead, it will be preserved for agriculture, scenic beauty, and wildlife habitat. Rafael also volunteers on the board of Conserving Carolina.

One of the reasons they chose to protect San Felipe Farm is because it means so much to their community. Mary says, “It’s a very nice farm. I think the view from the road is special. We know a lot of people enjoy it because a lot of people stop here to watch the lambs, but also just to see what we’re up to. You know how they say if you want to meet people, get a dog? If you want to know your neighbors, just have a few sheep. Everyone came to see us, to see what we were doing, to ask questions, to see if they could take pictures, paint or bring their children.

They welcome visitors and Rafael hopes that some of the young people will take an interest in farming. “Hopefully we can put the little seed in someone’s head like I was given.”

The conservation easement guarantees that this land will be there for the next generation to use. And it will be good ground.

“It’s not just the bondage,” says Rafael, “it’s what we do every day that makes the difference. If we keep it in better condition, if we help things to grow more easily, both plants and animals, we feel that we are contributing to the future. For us, it’s every day.

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Where is Fellows Farm in Suffolk? https://regbiomed.com/where-is-fellows-farm-in-suffolk/ Sun, 17 Jul 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/where-is-fellows-farm-in-suffolk/ Farming is a proud part of life here in Suffolk, with some farms being family run for generations. But there is a new generation of farmers who are leading an ecological revolution, changing the way they use their land and grow our food. Among them is Ben Mackinnon. Ben Mackinnon, owner of Fellows Farm, harvesting […]]]>

Farming is a proud part of life here in Suffolk, with some farms being family run for generations.

But there is a new generation of farmers who are leading an ecological revolution, changing the way they use their land and grow our food.

Among them is Ben Mackinnon.


Ben Mackinnon, owner of Fellows Farm, harvesting cucumbers
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Ben’s certified organic 70-acre Fellows farm in Gosbeck is dedicated to making and growing healthy food for us and the planet — and he’s keen to share that process with as many people as possible.

Originally from Eye and brought up in the Waveney Valley, Ben has always had an affinity for the great British countryside.

“I grew up surrounded by fields in Fressingfield, and although my parents weren’t farmers, they had a smallholding when I was very young,” he explains.


Ben Mackinnon creates sourdough from his fresh produce

Ben Mackinnon creates sourdough from his fresh produce
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

“They had a cow and milked it, and my father kept a large flock of turkeys for the Christmas market. My mother was also a vegetable lover.

As a teenager, Ben worked on a nearby organic farm before leaving to study in Scotland.

“I’ve always been very interested in the natural world and conservation from a young age, so when I finished high school I studied fisheries and conservation biology.”


Scholarship Farm

Scholarship Farm
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

After completing his studies, Ben went to work in fishing before continuing his studies in sustainability and renewable energy. “I ended up working as a sustainability consultant for a large multinational in London. I did that for a few years, but I didn’t like an office role – I’m a fairly active person, so it wasn’t for me. And I didn’t feel like what I was working on made a difference to our long-term survival — I wanted to do something with my hands,” he says.

Ben took time for himself and discovered one of his greatest passions: baking.


Ben Mackinnon creates sourdough from his fresh produce

Ben Mackinnon creates sourdough from his fresh produce
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

“I took an artisan bread course and realized baking was for me,” he says.

Soon after, he found himself setting up e5 Bakehouse in East London – which has since grown into an empire in its own right. “The business has grown from just me to now a few bakeries and cafes with 100 employees,” he says.

“After doing this for almost 10 years, I realized that Suffolk had never really left my heart. I always came back here, and my parents live here. So when I started my family, we moved in a field that I had bought about six years before.

It was in this field that he grew oats, wheat and buckwheat which he used in the bakery in London.

“We moved here in 2019 when I found I could convert a small cabin on the land into something we could live in.”

And so, Fellows Farm was born.


Fellows Farm fresh produce

Fellows Farm fresh produce
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

“The reason we wanted to be here was to try and grow fruit and vegetables, initially for the London cafe, but also to build relationships with local farmers who grew the heritage grains we grind at the bakery. ”

With a focus on regenerative agriculture, Ben wants to change the way food is purchased, ensuring it is as environmentally friendly as possible for current and future generations.

“It’s a really exciting time to look at how food is produced and to see how we can do it in a way that allows us to live in balance with nature. The more biodiversity we have, the more resilient our ecosystems will be – and I wanted to explore firsthand how we could actually achieve this,” he says.

Ben wants to reduce the carbon footprint of farming by using less energy, as well as fewer pesticides and herbicides. “I just don’t believe they are needed to produce food. I also want to reduce nitrogen fertilizers that flow into rivers, so we are working to reduce our reliance on those types of fertilizers,” he says.


Fellows Farm fresh produce

Fellows Farm fresh produce
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

“We also want to improve soil health, which is the fundamental basis of a sustainable and regenerative agricultural system.”

To help him achieve this goal, he used a no-dig market garden on his farm, with the help of chef-turned-regenerative farmer Lughan Carr.

Using locally sourced compost from nearby stables, the farm grows a variety of fruits and vegetables, including heirloom tomatoes, six varieties of zucchini, cucumbers, turnips, herbs, peas and beans.


Fresh tomatoes from Fellows Farm

Fresh tomatoes from Fellows Farm
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

“We have an acre of market garden here at Fellows Farm, which is 100 long beds that we maintain by hand, several polytunnels, and we are currently establishing a two acre vineyard. We then bring what we grow to cafes in London, but we want to develop a more local clientele,” he says.

“We recycle all our cuttings from the garden and bring all the coffee waste from our cafes back to London and also use those from the compost.”

In order to regenerate the soil, the farm also grows old varieties of wheat.

“They existed before intensive agriculture, so they are really suitable for agricultural systems that do not depend on fertilizers or pesticides, because they evolved in a time when we did not have them. What we’ve found as bakers is that they’re really delicious too – they’re incredibly flavorful and work well in breads, pizzas and cakes.

Elsewhere on the site, there are sheep pastures, ponds and an area dedicated to agroforestry.


Scholarship Farm

Scholarship Farm
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

“We have rows of trees with 25m gaps, which allows combines to pass between them, but the idea is that in addition to producing fruit, we provide habitats for animals and insects, to help improve soil biology. This allows natural predators, such as beetles, to eat the slugs rather than using pesticides.

“What we do is not necessarily the answer – but we all need to explore ways to cultivate in a way that our children and grandchildren can continue – and this is an exploration of that. We have lived here for three years now, but the generosity and warmth of the local farmers has been incredible, and they have been so kind with their knowledge and support.

Additionally, Fellows Farm is home to a campsite, weaving mill, vineyard, micro-bakery and mill. There are also 15 acres of permanent wildflower meadow.


Scholarship Farm

Scholarship Farm
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Think of it as a place where people can go and experience the beauty of the Suffolk countryside firsthand.

“I guess I like bringing the field to life and creating a mix of elements that make up the farm. One of my dreams in life was to create more opportunities here in the countryside. Deep down I love farming, but baking is my number one passion. When I moved here I bought a wood oven with me and for the two years we did weekly baking we made sourdough breads. And local chef Nicola Hordern, who set up Darsham Nurseries, she’s a great chef and often came over on Saturdays to make pastries and pies.


Yurts and bell tents at Fellows Farm

Yurts and bell tents at Fellows Farm
– Credit: Sarah Lucy Brown

Recently, Ben hosted over 50 guests for a farm-to-fork dining experience – something he would like to do more of in the future.

“We brought in a chef who cooked local game, and everything came from the market garden. They all pitched tents and stayed put. It really created an earthy, warm and informal environment in which to gather.

“We would like to do more, and maybe add some locally made wine and bread as well.”

Coming in August, Fellows Farm will host a pizza and music event starting at 5 p.m. on Friday, August 12.

Find out more at fellowsfarm.co.uk

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The cells that keep fungal infections at bay https://regbiomed.com/the-cells-that-keep-fungal-infections-at-bay/ Wed, 13 Jul 2022 15:38:27 +0000 https://regbiomed.com/the-cells-that-keep-fungal-infections-at-bay/ Candida albicans. Credit: Wikipedia. Of all the fungi that live in the human body, the most infamous is probably Candida yeast. This distant cousin of baker’s yeast is known to cause various types of thrush which can be a major nuisance, but it can also lead to an invasive infection which can, on occasion, prove […]]]>

Candida albicans. Credit: Wikipedia.

Of all the fungi that live in the human body, the most infamous is probably Candida yeast. This distant cousin of baker’s yeast is known to cause various types of thrush which can be a major nuisance, but it can also lead to an invasive infection which can, on occasion, prove fatal. In a study published today in Natural immunologyA research team from the Weizmann Institute of Science led by Professor Jakub Abramson has discovered a previously unknown defense mechanism used by the immune system to fight Candida infections.

Candida is present in low levels in the body of most healthy people, forming part of the microbiome – a diverse spectrum of microbes that reside peacefully in our gut and on our skin. Under normal circumstances, Candida is controlled by the immune system, but it can occasionally grow excessively, invading the lining of the mouth, vagina, skin or other parts of the body. In severe cases, it can spread to the bloodstream and from there to the kidneys. Such life-threatening infections can occur when a person’s immune system has been weakened, for example, by AIDS or by immunosuppressive drugs such as cancer chemotherapy or steroids. Antibiotics, which eliminate many beneficial bacteria from our microbiome, can also trigger local or invasive Candida outbreaks by giving this yeast an unfair advantage over other microorganisms. This is why, for example, women sometimes develop vaginal yeast infection after taking antibiotics.

Until now, the most recognized immune cells for defending the body against Candida were the small round T-cell type lymphocytes, called TH17. These cells were also the ones blamed when this defense failed.

In the new study, postdoctoral fellow Dr. Jan Dobeš, working with colleagues in Abramson’s lab in Weizmann’s Department of Immunology and Regenerative Biology, found that a powerful commando unit of TH17 cells capable of fighting candidiasis cannot be generated without crucial early support from an entirely different contingent: a subset of rare lymphoid cells called type 3 innate lymphoid cells, or ILC3, which express a gene called autoimmune regulator, or Aire

The two groups of cells belong to the two different arms of the immune system which, like foot patrols and specialized units, join forces against a common enemy. Part of the oldest innate arm, Aire-ILC3 kicks into action almost immediately upon encountering a threat, in this case, a Candida infection. The THThe 17s belong to the newer adaptive arm of the immune system, which takes days or even weeks to react, but which launches a much more targeted and powerful attack than the innate one.






Credit: Weizmann Institute of Science

The scientists found that as soon as Candida starts infecting the tissues, the Aire-ILC3s engulf the whole yeast, chopping them up and displaying some of the yeast pieces on their surfaces. This is how these bits are presented to the TH17, a few of which are usually on guard in the lymph nodes, ready for infection alert. This type of presentation directs specialized T cells to begin dividing rapidly, growing from a few isolated commandos to hundreds or even thousands of Candida-specific fighters capable of destroying yeast at sites of infection.

“We have identified a previously unrecognized immune system weapon that is critical to orchestrating an effective response against fungal infection,” Abramson said.

Abramson was intrigued by Candida because it typically leads to serious chronic infections in people with a rare autoimmune syndrome caused by defects in the Aire gene. Abramson’s lab had conducted extensive studies on this gene, helping to clarify its role in preventing autoimmune diseases. This research, along with studies by other scientists, had shown that Aire-expressing cells in the thymus instruct developing T cells to refrain from attacking the body’s own tissues. When Aire is faulty, the T cells don’t get the proper instructions, causing widespread autoimmunity that wreaks havoc in multiple organs in the body. But one enigma remained: why would Aire-deficient patients suffering from a devastating autoimmune syndrome also develop chronic Candida infections?

In trying to complete the Aire puzzle, Dobeš and colleagues discovered that apart from the thymus, Aire is also expressed in a small subset of ILC3 in the lymph nodes. The researchers then genetically modified two groups of mice: one lacked Aire in the thymus, and the other group lacked it in the ILC3s of the lymph nodes. The first group developed autoimmunity but managed to fight off Candida. In contrast, those in the second group, those lacking Aire in ILC3s, did not suffer from autoimmunity, but were unable to generate many Candida-specific TH17s. Therefore, they failed to eliminate Candida infections effectively. In other words, without Aire-expressing ILC3s, the specialized T cells needed to fight Candida were not produced in sufficient numbers.

“We found an entirely new role for Aire, the one it plays in the lymph nodes, by activating a mechanism that increases the number of Candida-fighting T cells,” says Dobeš.

These findings open up new directions of research that, in the future, could help develop new treatments for severe Candida, and possibly for other fungal infections. The newly discovered mechanism could, for example, help produce large numbers of Candida-fighting T cells for use in cell therapy. And if scientists ever identify the signals by which Aire-ILC3 stimulate T cell proliferation, these signals themselves could form the basis of new therapies.


Identification of lymph node cells that may play an important role in immune tolerance


More information:
Jan Dobeš et al, Extrathymic expression of Aire controls the induction of an effective TH17 cell-mediated immune response against Candida albicans, Natural immunology (2022). DOI: 10.1038/s41590-022-01247-6

Provided by Weizmann Institute of Science


Quote: Curbing Candida: The cells that keep fungal infections at bay (July 13, 2022) Retrieved July 13, 2022 from https://medicalxpress.com/news/2022-07-curbing-candida-cells-fungal-infections.html

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